Tag Archives: University of Kansas

Kansas Frontier Justice

The early immigrants to all western territories found life hard and rough, and often violent.  After the creation of the state of Kansas in 1854, rival governments arose, pro-slavery or anti-slavery; and sectional rivalries, conflict with Missouri escalated, it is no wonder a civil war wouldn’t erupt.

Among the immigrant shared experiences were Indian wars resulting from white encroachments on lands that were part of Indian reserves; lawlessness and the eccentricities of frontier justice; political battles over the location of territorial capitals (Lecompton-pro-slavery or Topeka-free state); corruption at the government land offices; bitter conflicts over land claims and the planting of town sites; as well as transportation lines, and banking facilities. (America in 1857-Kenneth M. Stampp)

In Massachusetts, after a story of a runaway slave incident in Boston, the New England Emigrant Aid Company was  recruiting abolitionists to move to Kansas and the new territories.  Among the first agents chosen were Dr. Charles Robinson, who became the first Governor of Kansas; and James Lane, from Indiana, who was an ambitious leader with a military background. In 1855 the two men were influential in framing the Topeka free-state constitution and its governing forces.

Kansas became a Free State. (Much more history that I could include but will save that for my book.)  I love to see what motivates people to do what they do, namely Charles Robinson and James Lane.

There is also Amos A. Lawrence, philanthropist, from Boston who gave financially to the abolitionist cause and to making Kansas a free state; and who the city of Lawrence, KS was named after.  He also helped in the funding of a college at the University of KansasRock Chalk Jayhawks (my emphasis) information taken from an article in Aug 2013-L JWorld)

So I am wondering how James Lane made it 90 miles north to the Sycamore Springs area.  Also John Brown is included in this mix too. And what about what was happening with the North American Indians.  More next time…