Tag Archives: Sabetha

John Brown from Quindaro, Kansas City, KS to Albany, Nemaha County, Kansas

 

Slaves coming via The Missouri River to TopekaJohn Brown Holy War

Lane Trail Going North to Nebraska

Slaves were escorted by John Brown  from the Missouri River to Quindaro, Kansas City, Kansas to Topeka and elsewhere.

Quindero ruins1Quindaro Trail, Kansas City

Quindero ruins2-2Quindaro Ruins, Kanss City

Lane Freedom Trail from Topeka to Sabetha (60+ miles), Nemaha, Kansas stopping at Albany

Albany

In 1857 a colony of a dozen or more families, related by blood and affinity settled Albany, naming their town in honor of the New York capital of their native state. They settled at the head of Pony Creek, two miles north of present Sabetha on the east edge of Nemaha County, Kansas. Among these pioneers were the families of William and Samuel Slosson, (who both later (1873) bought the property land of Sycamore Springs), John and William Graham, Noble H. Rising, John Tyler, George Lyons, Edwin Miller and Elihu Whittenhall. Educated, cultured, and possessing good sound business sense, they were whole-hearted supporters of Free State principles.

JBrownJohn Brown

John Brown and his camp of men and slaves spent his last night in Kansas in the Elihu Whittenhall cabin located in Albany, north of Sabetha. (My book will include more details about Sabetha and Albany.)This was considered a prominent “safe” house. May Wines, a former resident of this home often spoke of the secret passage where the slaves were hiding. (I knew Ms. Wines many years ago, and she wrote many historical articles about Albany and Sabetha.)The following day William Graham escorted Brown’s party using the Lane Trail to the Missouri River in Nebraska Territory.

The Lane Trail served as part of the Underground Railroad as well as a route for Free-State Immigrants.

John Brown and the slaves stopped at Plymouth Springs before heading north into Nebraska.

James Lane had established Fort Plymouth in Sept. 1856 on Lane’s Trail southeast corner on Pony Creek, 6 miles northeast of present Sabetha, present day Sycamore Springs. Plymouth was well armed with rifles and bolstered by a small cannon.

This isolation made it an ideal route for the Underground, and the existence of free-state settlers along the trail guaranteed their safety.

(We are almost to the continuing story of Sycamore Springs)

 

James Lane Trail and the Underground Railroad

As Background Material I have included the following:

In 1801, President Thomas Jefferson wanted to purchase the Louisiana port of New Orleans from France.  This was an important seaport for the farmers of America.  Napoleon needed money to fight war with Britain and agreed to the sale.  The area included 828,000,000 square miles at the price of 15 Million Dollars. The Louisiana Purchase was arranged between the United States and the Government of France, 1803.  Slavery was a legalized institution, and many of the residents held slaves.  Slave holding was a major issue in America.

The creation of trails for moving people across the frontier became a reality after the Lewis and Clark Expedition of 1803.   The Lane Trail (James Lane) was one with controversy.

Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854.

Immigrants were going west on the Oregon and California Trails for new land to settle. The Territories of Kansas and Nebraska were being met by many. In 1854, Congress passed the Kansas-Nebraska Act, during Franklin Pierce’s presidency.  The Territories of Kansas and Nebraska should have the right and privilege of making laws suitable to them, covering the issue of slavery.

James Lane (1814-1866), was a lawyer; US Senator, a Union General and a devotee of the American Civil War.  Being involved in the abolitionist movement and agent of the (New England) Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Society, he moved to Kansas (1855) during the Bleeding Kansas period.  It was important for them to help people move to Kansas to aid in abolishing slavery and more importantly able to vote against the slave issue.  He was called the leader of the “Jayhawkers”, known as the Kansas Brigade, a leading Free Soil militant group.

The Lane Trail not only moved slaves from southern captivity to eventual northern freedom in Canada, but was used by Union soldiers. Free-state settlers used the Trail to avoid intimidation tactics by those in pro-slavery Missouri.  The Under-ground Railroad, the Lane Trail, became the trail to move slaves.

The Trail began in Topeka leading north to Holton.  The Lane “Chimneys” or rock cairns (landmark stacks of rocks) guided the travelers.  From Holton going north to Netawaka and moved towards Powhattan. All of the wagon trains advanced with caution. Escaped slaves were sheltered in Old Powhattan until it was safe to move north. The trail went further north through Pleasant Spring (Granada) and Capioma to Lexington, south of Sabetha.

Lane had built a small fort of hewn logs at Lexington.  (This fort and trail isn’t too far from where the George Williams homestead existed.  This is probably how James Lane knew George and Alice Gray Williams.)

From Lexington, the trail went to Sabetha and Albany. (More will be written about these towns later). From Albany, the group would join nearby Pony Creek and venture on to Plymouth.

Fort Plymouth located on Pony Creek near present day Sycamore Springs was a well-known fortification. Lane and his men had built the Fort along the Lane Trail. (More about this in a later post)

The Trail moved on north across the Nemaha River into Nebraska to the towns of Salem and Falls City and then moved across the Missouri River east to Iowa City, Iowa. There was movement in both directions.

Pioneers stopped and settled near the posts. All of the posts along the Lane Trail eventually became towns. You can see how the Lane Trail became controversial and yet pivotal to the progression of the United States as a nation.

 

Prospective Kansas Retreat for Artists and Creative Writers

There is a rich history connected to Sycamore Springs Resort near Sabetha, Kansas.  Yes, I will get to the history later!

At this time, the resort is for sale.  It makes me sad to see what is happening to the place.  It has been a vibrant, active, go to place, for so many years.

I lived there during the 1950s and 1960s and the place was alive and well.  It was” the” place to be.  It was Mid-Century Modern as we would know it now.

What I envision for the coming years for Sycamore Springs could be meaningful for future generations.

Exploring the web for information about creative artists and writers and their resources I came across several established properties pertaining to this issue. Yaddo   is located near Saratoga Springs, New York; and the other Hedgebrook is in the Seattle, Washington area. Also, D.H. Lawrence Ranch, Taos, New Mexico offers retreats for writers.

Am I missing something here?  Wouldn’t it fit to have a place to retreat like these in the middle of the United States? Like Kansas?  There are many opportunities to preserve the history and offer the property a new legacy.

The Swimming Pool and Skating Rink could be for public use and add financial resources for the Residence.

Sycamore Springs is perfect for this type of Retreat or Residency.  It has accommodations available; it is in a rural setting; and there are many areas to wander (wonder, too) and create.  I think there is potential here, not only for writers but artists of any genre.  Yes, it needs some TLC and upgrades but the bones are there.

I don’t own the facility but I do know who does.  If this is something of interest, email me: storybookpieces@gmail.com.