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John Brown from Quindaro, Kansas City, KS to Albany, Nemaha County, Kansas

 

Slaves coming via The Missouri River to TopekaJohn Brown Holy War

Lane Trail Going North to Nebraska

Slaves were escorted by John Brown  from the Missouri River to Quindaro, Kansas City, Kansas to Topeka and elsewhere.

Quindero ruins1Quindaro Trail, Kansas City

Quindero ruins2-2Quindaro Ruins, Kanss City

Lane Freedom Trail from Topeka to Sabetha (60+ miles), Nemaha, Kansas stopping at Albany

Albany

In 1857 a colony of a dozen or more families, related by blood and affinity settled Albany, naming their town in honor of the New York capital of their native state. They settled at the head of Pony Creek, two miles north of present Sabetha on the east edge of Nemaha County, Kansas. Among these pioneers were the families of William and Samuel Slosson, (who both later (1873) bought the property land of Sycamore Springs), John and William Graham, Noble H. Rising, John Tyler, George Lyons, Edwin Miller and Elihu Whittenhall. Educated, cultured, and possessing good sound business sense, they were whole-hearted supporters of Free State principles.

JBrownJohn Brown

John Brown and his camp of men and slaves spent his last night in Kansas in the Elihu Whittenhall cabin located in Albany, north of Sabetha. (My book will include more details about Sabetha and Albany.)This was considered a prominent “safe” house. May Wines, a former resident of this home often spoke of the secret passage where the slaves were hiding. (I knew Ms. Wines many years ago, and she wrote many historical articles about Albany and Sabetha.)The following day William Graham escorted Brown’s party using the Lane Trail to the Missouri River in Nebraska Territory.

The Lane Trail served as part of the Underground Railroad as well as a route for Free-State Immigrants.

John Brown and the slaves stopped at Plymouth Springs before heading north into Nebraska.

James Lane had established Fort Plymouth in Sept. 1856 on Lane’s Trail southeast corner on Pony Creek, 6 miles northeast of present Sabetha, present day Sycamore Springs. Plymouth was well armed with rifles and bolstered by a small cannon.

This isolation made it an ideal route for the Underground, and the existence of free-state settlers along the trail guaranteed their safety.

(We are almost to the continuing story of Sycamore Springs)