Tag Archives: Free State

Anti-Slavery or Pro-Slavery, Danger Up Ahead!

In the 1850s white settlers were starting to travel to the West or settling in Kansas. They would often stop at the mineral springs for their water (word must have been passed on for many to know about the springs).The surrounding area has some added historical significance too and will be in a later post and also in my book.

Near the mineral springs, James Lane laid out the town of Plymouth giving the springs area its name of Plymouth Springs. (Not too much is known about this but by 1858 only one house remained.

James LaneJames Lane  

James Lane and his army established a fort nearby and was visible until 1883. (I plan to do more research about the fort and the town of Plymouth.  This will be included in the book I am writing.)

The family of George Williams (later the husband of Alice Gray) was also involved with the struggles of the New State of Kansas. The new State was being established and disagreements arose as to whether Kansas should be a Free State or a Slave State.

Can you imagine the vastness of the decisions that had to be made to govern the state?

George’s father, Eli Williams, was an elected member of the State legislature and had made plans to go to a meeting in Lecompton. Lecompton was chosen as the First Territorial Capital for Kansas.

Eli was a prominent figure in the early struggles of the new Kansas territory.  They had good horses saddled, with saddle bags and canteens for water.  A sack was thrown across the back of the saddles, which contained flour and bacon, and a frying pan, gun and hatchet.  They were ready to meet the danger that might lie ahead.

The famous James Lane had sent word to Eli Williams that he was not to come, as they could be killed during an outbreak of the anti-slavery and pro-slavery issues that were being discussed. The Williams family lived near Oneida which is about 15 miles from Plymouth Springs (or Sycamore Springs as we now know it).

James Lane and Eli Williams were to meet at another designated place. Back home, George and his sister, Fanny, stood guard that night at their cabin door with axe and knife handy, ready to sell their lives in defense of what might happen.

Taken From Nemaha County History

Coming soon: The James Lane Trail and the Underground Railroad