John Brown and the Underground Railroad

Underground Railroad Map  James Lane Trail Coming Out of Western Missouri, into Northeast Kansas Territory, and Back East to Iowa

State of Kansas-Nemaha CountyNemaha County, Kansas.  Area with Underground Railroad traffic

In Washington, the James Buchanan Administration validated the election results and the territorial legislature was preparing to draft what would be known as the pro-slavery, Lecompton Constitution.

In 1855, Brown moved to Kansas near Osawatomie, leaving behind numerous lawsuits and business entanglements in Ohio. In Kansas, from 1855-1859, John Brown came to help with the slavery issue. He became a white American abolitionist who believed an armed uprising was the only way to overthrow the institution of slavery in the United States. He would murder for the cause. Brown was known as a “folk hero” in the North and a “terrorist” in the South (Was he like the terrorists we hear about today?  In his own way?) He thought he was chosen to fight this “holy war”. His radical ideas about racial equality set him apart from other abolitionists.

John Brown Mural Mural of John Brown in Kansas Capital Building-Topeka, KS

The Lane Trail was used by John Brown and others to transport slaves north to freedom.

Slaves were chattels (personal property), and those aiding in their escape could be prosecuted for receiving and concealing stolen property. In Netawaka, John Brown and the slaves spent the night. When no move was made to arrest them, Brown loaded the slaves into wagons and headed north.

 

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